Support Options

From our San Francisco, CA headquarters, to the Blackbird Oceanic Society Field Station in Belize, base in Suriname, and to our field station in Micronesia.... The non-profit Oceanic Society funds and operates conservation projects around the world, partly due to our solid membership base.

Supporting the Oceanic Society through membership is another way to assist with our conservation and education efforts. Donations are tax-deductible.

HOW TO SUPPORT THE OCEANIC SOCIETY

While you don't have to become an Oceanic Society member to participate in our many activities, our 3000+ members would certainly welcome you into the community. Members enjoy additional benefits, though, and the intangible aspects of joining with other people that share your values about conserving our endangered oceanic whales, dolphins, turtles, and other species.

Your support to Oceanic Society will help us assure a healthy future for ocean wildlife and habitats worldwide. Oceanic Society is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization (tax ID: 94-3105570) and your contributions are tax-deductible to the fullest extent allowable by law.  There are several ways to support Oceanic Society:

GENERAL DONATIONS

General donations to Oceanic Society give us the flexibility to put your support to work where it is needed most. We appreciate your donation in any amount.

Turneffe Atoll (Belize) Project

Turneffe Atoll is the largest and most biologically diverse coral atoll in the western hemisphere, supporting a number of endangered and endemic species. Your support is needed to continue our ongoing research on coral reefs, bottlenose dolphins, American crocodiles, and Antillean manatees, as well as to support the implementation of the Turneffe Atoll Management Plan.

Ulithi Atoll Sea Turtle Project

Oceanic Society’s community-based sea turtle project in Micronesia directly funds Ulithian community members to monitor endangered sea turtles and generate research data that are used to inform local conservation decisions.

A donation of any amount will be greatly appreciated.

Beth MastBeth Mast was a great lover of the outdoors who enjoyed a deep connection to nature throughout her life, from trips to the Galapagos Islands in her earlier years to bird watching and visits to Yellowstone later in her life.

Oceanic Society is proud to honor Beth's legacy by accepting memorial donations in her honor. Your contributions will be used to support our global efforts to deepen the connections between people and nature.

Oceanic Society is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, and your contribution is fully tax-deductible. 

Join the Oceanic Society

BENEFITS OF BECOMING A MEMBER

  • Get access to special information and advance notification of special events 
  • Receive our members-only e-newsletter
  • Directly support our efforts to protect marine wildlife and habitats
  • Help educate others about ways to preserve and protect marine ecosystems as part of the growing oceanic society

COST

Regular membership: $35/year

Sustaining membership: $50/year

Join the Oceanic Society - as a Sustaining Member

BENEFITS OF BECOMING A MEMBER

  • Get access to special information and advance notification of special events 
  • Receive our members-only e-newsletter
  • Directly support our efforts to protect marine wildlife and habitats
  • Help educate others about ways to preserve and protect marine ecosystems as part of the growing oceanic society

COST

Regular membership: $35/year
Sustaining membership: $50/year

Give a wonderful experience...


The Gift Vouchers program is a wonderful way for someone else to experience the joy of watching and connecting with these amazing animals.

HOW IT WORKS:

  1. Order your voucher. We can send it to you, or to the person receiving the gift.

  2. Book your trip by calling the Oceanic Society Office at 800-326-7491.

  3. Your voucher becomes the payment for the trip

  4. Vouchers are good for one year from the date of purchase.

-----ORDER ON-LINE BELOW-------

OTHER WAYS TO ORDER

Download our gift voucher form and

 send it to us.

Half-Moon Bay

Farallon Islands

Order by phone:
(415)441-1106 or
800-326-7491

 

Reserve your spot now for one of our exciting expeditions.

Your initial reservation will require a $750 per person deposit, and can be paid by credit card, PayPal account, check, or money order. We offer a convenient, secure, online deposit option using the form at the bottom of this page, or you can print our reservation form and mail it to us with your payment.

Your final payment should be by check or money order, due 120 days before the expedition departs (liveaboard trips may have earlier due dates which will be noted in the specific trip description).

READ OUR GENERAL TERMS & CONDITIONS and the LIABILITY AND RELEASE (below) before making your reservation. Please note that our LIVEABOARD CHARTER programs may have separate terms and conditions; please contact our office for these.

LIABILITY AND RELEASE:
In traveling to and from any expedition and during the expedition itself, there are certain risks and dangers, including but not limited to the hazards arising from the forces of nature, from living aboard ship, from accident or illness without medical facilities, and from travel itself. In consideration of, and as part payment for, the right to participate in any expedition, I hereby voluntarily assume all of those and all other reasonably foreseeable hazards which may be encountered on an expedition, including acts of God, detention, annoyance, weather, quarantines, strikes, civil disturbance, theft, government regulations, etc. I agree to hold Oceanic Society Expeditions harmless from any and all liability, actions, causes of action, debts, claims and demands of every kind and nature whatsoever, including but not limited to those arising from any loss, injury, damage, or inconvenience to person or property in connection with any expedition.

TRAVEL INSURANCE
Note: All individuals have different insurance needs. We provide these recommendations for your assistance. However, it is up to you, the traveler, to understand the policies and their terms, to confirm that you have the coverage you need, and to ensure that you are not duplicating coverage that you already have.

We strongly recommend that you purchase travel cancellation insurance to protect your investment. Purchasing a Travelex protection plan will help ease your mind should an emergency arise. Travelex insurance plans offer a variety of benefits and emergency assistance services should you need to cancel or interrupt your trip in any way. Click the banner below to learn more.
Travelex Travel Insurance

Join DANIn addition, we also strongly advise all of our travelers to purchase a Divers Alert Network (DAN) MembershipDAN membership offers $100,000 Medical Evacuation Coverage on any trip taken while a member (including for all listed family members with a family membership), assistance through DAN TravelAssist®, a subscription to Alert Diver magazine and access to DAN’s insurance services. Membership is just $35 for individuals and $55 for families.


RESERVE YOUR SPOT NOW:

Online sign-up - below

(Payment via PayPal, which accepts Visa, Mastercard, Discover, and American Express).

       --- Or ---

Mail-In Reservation Form

(Download our Reservation Form, and mail it in with your check or credit card information)

INSTRUCTIONS FOR ONLINE RESERVATIONS

  • Fill out the form below for yourself, and then click Add to Cart
  • If this reservation is for more than one person, you can specify the number of people (and hence the number of $750 deposits) after you click Add to Cart. Simply change the number, and click Udate Cart.
  • At the checkout, you will have another opportunity to review your order and make any changes before your payment is processed.

Oceanic Society Field Guide

An illustrated, concise guide to the Marine Mammals of the eastern North Pacific ocean.

Field Guide

Adopt a dolphin for the dolphin-lover in your life.

dolphin Contribute to valuable scientific research about free-swimming dolphins and join the efforts to protect dolphins around the world.

For a $40.00 tax-deductible donation, you receive a personalized adoption certificate with a color photograph of the dolphin you choose and information about your dolphin. 

Proceeds from the Adopt a Dolphin program are used to support Oceanic Society's global research and conservation programs that aim to study and protect dolphins and other threatened marine species.

The dolphins available for adoption are known individually through their natural markings and have been identified through Oceanic Project Dolphin, a long term spotted dolphin research program in the Bahamas. Researchers have named and constructed life histories for over 130 individual dolphins. You can adopt one of The Bahamas' dolphins such as Stubby, Top Notch, or TS, gain a window into their watery world, and learn about their personality traits.

Oceanic Society began the Adopt A Dolphin program in 1988 as a means for public involvement and to generate support for our research programs. Your support will help us continue our international marine research and conservation programs. Here are the names of some spotted dolphins often seen during our research season.

To Adopt a Dolphin:

Scroll down to the bottom of this page to place your order, or click on a picture

Otherwise, you may download our Adoption Form, fill it out, and send it in to us by mail.

Here are some of the dolphins that are available for adoption:

Concordia dolphin
CONCORDIA:

Now a sub-adult male with a scalloped dorsal fin. Gregarious and playful, often seen with other sub-adults, zig-zagging around swimmers.

TS dolphin
T.S.:

Adult female on the 1989 Oceanic Society tee-shirt. Easily recognized by the deep gash in her tail stock and fluke. She is friendly and often brings her calf to swim with people.

topnotch dolphin
TOPNOTCH:

An adult female with a concave scar at the tip of her dorsal fin, Topnotch is very friendly and seems to enjoy mimicking people during swim encounters.

Remorra Dolphin
REMORA KID:

A friendly female dolphin with distinct spots on her flank. She was photographed as a juvenile, with a remora attached to her.

double gash dolphin
DOUBLE GASH:

Fully spotted adult male named for the distinctive gashes behind his dorsal fin and on his tail stock. Often swims with other adult dolphins and scans the periphery.

Sadie dolphin
SADIE:

An adult female often seen with her calf, or baby-sitting other calves, Sadie seems very friendly, and frequently socializes with other mothers and their young.

Larry dolphin
LARRY:

One of the first dolphins identified in 1989 for the Bahamas Project Dolphin. Larry is a beautiful full-sized adult male, and has been seen consistently through the years.

macho dolphin
MACHO:

Large, heavily spotted adult male almost always seen alone. Known for his many displays, including slapping his powerful flukes at the surface, belly-up.

Stubby dolphin
STUBBY:

Named for his severed dorsal fin, Stubby is every dolphin's friend. Whether playing with calves, jostling with juveniles or socializing with females or males, Stubby is one "cool" dolphin.

Sunflower dolphin
SUNFLOWER:

A handsome juvenile male, first identified in 1997. Sunflower is between 8-12 years old, and one of our most photogenic dolphins.

Fin dolphin
FIN:

Fully mature female spotted dolphin, named for her nicked fin. Fin is an elegant dolphin, whose white lateral spots have fused to form a bright streak and wispy curlicues along her side.

 

DOLPHIN ADOPTION FORM

Please fill out:

  • Your adoption choice (new adoption or renewal)
  • Whether this is a gift or not
  • Gift recipient (leave blank if this is not a gift)
  • Provide name and address below ONLY IF item is to be sent to the gift recipient

When you proceed to checkout, you will fill in the information about you as the purchaser

Adopt a whale for the whale-lover in your life.

Adopt a humpback whale

Support the efforts of the Whales of Guerrero Research Project and Oceanic Society to protect whales in Mexico and ocean wildlife and habitats worldwide by adopting a humpback whale today. Your tax-deductible symbolic adoption provides needed support to our programs.

Adopt a Whale for a Year: $60

For a tax-deductible adoption fee of $60, you receive a personalized certificate of adoption with a color photograph of the whale of your choice and information about your whale. You will also receive email updates about your whale if we spot it again during the year of your adoption, and updates about the Whales of Guerrero Research Project.

Adopt a Whale for Two Years: $100

For a tax-deductible adoption fee of $100, you receive a personalized certificate of adoption with a color photograph of the whale of your choice and information about your whale. You will also receive email updates about your whale if we spot it again during the two years of your adoption, and updates about the Whales of Guerrero Research Project. Because female humpback whales give birth every 2-3 years on average and don't always travel to Mexico during non-breeding years, your two-year adoption improves the chances that you'll be the first to know if we spot your whale again.

Become the Patron of a Whale (and name it): $1,000

For a $1,000 tax-deductible donation you can become the patron of a whale and earn the right to give it a name. The whale's name will be published in the Whales of Guerrero's fluke identification catalog and shared with research partners and whale watching communities in the whale's pathway. You will receive a personalized certificate of patronship with a color photograph of the whale of your choice and information about your whale, and we will send you digital copies of any additional photographs that we may have of your whale. You will also go down in history as the person or group who has supported this whale's long-term wellbeing through your generous contribution.

Oceanic Society started the Adopt-A-Whale program in 1988 as a way for the public to become involved in and support whale research in California and beyond. Today, your adoptions benefit the Whales of Guerrero Research Project's efforts to study and protect humpback whales in a previously unstudied region of Guerrero, Mexico and support community development. Whales are studied using photo identification, a non-invasive technique that uses photographs of whale flukes to identify individual whales and generate information about whale abundance and distribution.

If you are looking for information about whales that were previously available for adoption and naming on our website, please visit our Emeritus Whale Adoptions page.

To Adopt a Whale:

Choose from the list below of humpback whales that are currently available for adoption and to be named. To adopt or name a whale, complete the form at the bottom of the page, or click on the picture of the whale you wish to adopt.

Adopt a Whale

ID: WGRP001

Nickname: Dragon

Patron: Glenelg Country School

Gender: Female

First sighted: 16 Jan 2014

Age class: Adult

Age: >5

Dragon, humpback whale ID WGRP001, was the very first whale in our Guerrero fluke identification catalog. She was seen on January 16, 2014 traveling in the company of a calf. We hope to see her again next year! Adopt me!

Adopt a Whale

ID: WGRP003

Nickname: Unnamed

Patron: To be determined

Gender: Female

First sighted: 20 Jan 2014

Age class: Adult

Age: 9 (born winter 2005)

Humpback whale ID WGRP003 is the second whale for which we got a fluke ID and is the first one we matched to another catalog. We photographed her the day we saw her on January 20, 2014. When we traveled to visit our colleagues at Cascadia Research Collective in Seattle, we found out that humpback whale WGRP003 is no stranger to the research scientist’s telephoto zoom lens. Whale #003 was first spotted as a calf in 2005 in Moss Landing, California. Since then, she has been spotted and photographed 26 more times around Moss Landing and near the Farallon Islands. And so we know that this whale is now 9 years old. She had never been photographed in her winter mating grounds to our knowledge, so when we spotted her alone with a calf, we were able to add another piece to whale #003’s story – she’s a mother! Not only that, she is the mother of Kaplan Kids, a whale that has been known to Cascadia Research Collective since 1988 and was previously part of our adoptions program. Adopt me!

Adopt a Whale

ID: WGRP010

Nickname: Unnamed

Patron: To be determined

Gender: Unknown

First sighted: 5 Feb 2014

Age class: Adult

Age: Unknown

Humpback whale ID WGRP010 was first seen on February 5, 2014 traveling just outside of the city of Zihuatanejo, Mexico. There was a small group of rough toothed dolphins – a dolphin about which is little known – that seemed to be harassing this whale in some way. It was writhing around on the surface and acting "funny." We don’t know if this adult whale is a male or female, but it has enough distinctive markings on its tail and we have a good enough series of fluke ID photos that we should be able to find a match with another catalog if there’s another record of it out there! Adopt me!

Adopt a Whale

ID: WGRP018

Nickname: Unnamed

Patron: To be determined

Gender: Likely male

First sighted: 14 Feb 2014

Age class: Adult

Age: >5

Humpback whale ID WGRP018 is probably a male, although we can’t know for certain unless we can see the underside of its belly or get a DNA sample. We suspect it is a male because it was traveling with a female whale and her calf, acting as what we call an "escort." Although female whales, which have a gestation period of 12 months, rarely become pregnant and give birth two years in a row, it is not uncommon to spot two adult whales and a baby traveling together for extended periods of time and, most of the time, the trio is comprised of a female, her calf, and a male. DNA samples of other similar groups show that the male is not the father of the calf. So why do adult male whales spend their time with non-receptive females when there are others they might have better luck with? We just don't know; maybe they’re trying to score points for next year. It’s another wonderful mystery of marine mammal science. The distinctive leopard spot pattern on this whale's tail will make it a fun one to try to spot again on the water next year and to look for matches in our colleagues’ catalogs. Adopt me!

Adopt a Whale

ID: WGRP019

Nickname: Unnamed

Patron: To be determined

Gender: Unknown

First sighted (in Mexico): 18 Feb 2014

Age class: Adult

Age: >11

Humpback whale ID WGRP019 was first identified by Cascadia Research Collective and photographed by John Calambokidis on September 1, 2003 just west of the Farallon Islands, and John photographed it again on September 13, 2010 in Monterey Bay, due west of Moss Landing. We don’t know whether this whale is a male or female, but now we know that it traveled to Mexico after leaving its California feeding grounds in 2014. Adopt me!

Adopt a Whale

ID: WGRP021

Nickname: Unnamed

Patron: To be determined

Gender: Unknown

First sighted: 24 Feb 2014

Age class: Adult

Age: 9 (born winter 2005)

Humpback whale ID WGRP021 whale was our first match with our colleagues to the south of us in Oaxaca and we were all so excited to confirm that the whales that visit Guerrero also travel further south and spend time in the state of Oaxaca. Now that we have a confirmed match between the two regions, we are looking forward to finding out how they travel between the two states. Our colleagues in Oaxaca took a DNA sample of this whale’s skin in 2012, so we will know more about it once the skin biopsy has been analyzed. Adopt me!

Adopt a Whale

ID: WGRP023

Nickname: Ferdinand

Patron: Sandy High Aquanauts Club

Gender: Unknown

First sighted: 7 March 2014

Age class: Adult

Age: >11

Meet Ferdinand, a beautiful white-fluked whale named by the Aquanauts Club of Sandy High School in 2014. Ferdinand is the first whale we have records of seeing in both Banderas Bay and Nicaragua, so we know this whale gets around! Ferdinand was first photographed in Banderas Bay on Valentine's Day 2003 and was seen in Banderas Bay again in December 28, 2008 with another adult whale. Adopt me!

Adopt a Whale

ID: WGRP012

Nickname: Perlita

Patron: The Library of Barra de Potosí

Gender: Unknown

First sighted: 6 Feb 2014

Age class: Adult

Age: Unknown

Humpback whale WGRP012, nicknamed Perlita, was seen by us in February 2014, traveling slowly by the Morros, a gorgeous outcropping of rocks about 2 kilometers from the shore where we run our study. This whale was traveling alone and we don’t know if it is a male or female. However, we have recently found a match for Perlita’s fluke in the Cascadia Research Collective’s catalog, and soon will have a map of the other places this whale has been spotted and maybe find out if it is a male or female. Adopt me!

Adopt a Whale

ID: WGRP009

Nickname: Panfilo

Patron: Juan Carlos Solís Onofre & Cristofer Suestegui Reyes

Gender: Unknown

First sighted: 31 Jan 2014

Age class: Adult

Age: Unknown

Humpback whale WGRP009, nicknamed Panfilo, has an exceptionally pretty fluke that is easy to spot with its classic black and white markings and raised edge on one side. We spotted Panfilo on the surface with two other whales on January 31, 2014 being very active. This is what is known as a courtship group, as the group was either 3 males beginning to compete for a female that was not present, or two males competing for a female that was present with them during that time. Courtship groups are exciting to observe, as you get to see fins, flukes, lots of blows, and body parts as the whales twist and writhe on the surface. Adopt me!

Adopt a Whale

ID: WGRP004

Nickname: Unnamed

Patron: To be determined

Gender: Unknown

First sighted: 23 Jan 2014

Age class: Adult

Age: Unknown

Beautiful humpback whale WGRP004 was seen traveling alone heading slowly south along "turtle beach," a 20-mile long stretch of deserted beach in our region where four species of sea turtles come to nest. It may or may not have been the whale we saw breaching just a half hour before we photographed its fluke. We are not sure yet whether this group of whales associates with the subgroup of north Pacific humpback whales that travel to Costa Rica, or if it was headed elsewhere. How humpback whales travel through these parts, where they rest, mate, court, calve, and sing are the big mysteries we are trying to solve. We hope to see whale #004 again next winter and will be looking for its fluke in catalogs of our colleagues in Oaxaca, Banderas Bay, and Washington in the meantime. Adopt me!

Adopt a Whale

ID: WGRP024

Nickname: Unnamed

Patron: To be determined

Gender: Unknown

First sighted: 19 Mar 2014

Age class: Adult

Age: Unknown

Humpback whale WGRP024 is one of the last whales we were able to photo ID at the end of our first season on the water. Whale WGRP024 has been seen before by researchers from Cascadia Research Collective, and we were able to identify it by searching for that tiny little white dot in the center of its tail to find a match between our two catalogs. Adopt me!

Adopt a Whale

ID: WGRP025

Nickname: Unnamed

Patron: To be determined

Gender: Female

First sighted: 19 Mar 2014

Age class: Adult

Age: Unknown

Humpback whale WGRP025 is the last whale we were able to photo ID during our pilot season in the state of Guerrero, Mexico in 2014. It was a mother, traveling north with her calf, most likely to Monterey Bay and the Gulf of the Farallones in California, but possibly to Baja, the Channel Islands, or far north to Oregon or Washington. We’ll be looking for matches between this tail and ones in the catalogs maintained by our colleagues in Washington, Baja, Puerto Vallarta, and Oaxaca to see if we can come up with a match and fill in the picture about this whale. Hopefully she and her calf survived the long journey north! Adopt me!

WHALE ADOPTION FORM

Please fill out:

  • Your adoption choice
  • Whether this is a gift or not
  • Gift Recipient (leave blank if this is not a gift)
  • Provide name and address below ONLY IF item is to be sent to the gift recipient

When you proceed to Checkout, you will fill in the information about you as the purchaser

TURNEFFE ATOLL, BELIZE --- Adopt an Atoll

Turneffe Atoll

 

Turneffe Atoll is the most biologically diverse coral atoll in the Western Hemisphere. Your support will assist in the protection of this important habitat and the wildlife that depend on its health including manatees, seabirds, dolphins, sea turtles, corals, and tropical fish.

Help protect Turneffe Atoll and its wildlife... Join our Adopt-an-Atoll program.

Adopt a piece of this exquisite atoll:

Scroll down the page, and place your order.

Otherwise, you can download our pdf form and mail it to us.

BENEFITS

  • Knowing you support the natural treasures of Turneffe Atoll.
  • Learning about the wildlife and ecology of the Atoll.
  • Opportunities to become involved in research and conservation projects.
  • You are invited to attend annual meetings.

YOUR MONEY WILL HELP -

  • Preserve the habitat
  • Protect the wildlife
  • Support site specific research
  • Enhance preservation of traditional forms of ecologically sustainable resource use
  • Develop new sustainable economies and provide training
  • Promote environmental education
  • Monitor ecosystem health
  • Implement a Biosphere Reserve Initiative

OUR MISSION

To preserve, protect and restore the biological diversity of Turneffe Atoll while taking into account the interests of traditional users that utilize the atoll in an ecologically sustainable manner.

CONSERVATION OPPORTUNITY
The Oceanic Society has the opportunity to help preserve and protect the biological diversity of Turneffe Atoll. Our approach is to support the interests of traditional users that utilize the atoll in an ecologically sustainable manner.

BIOLOGICAL IMPORTANCE
Turneffe Atoll is the most biologically diverse coral atoll in the Western Caribbean. With more than 200 mangrove islands stretching over thirty miles, Turneffe is the largest atoll in Belize. The atoll's surrounding fringing reef is still pristine and its complex channels, spits and lagoons serve as a productive nursery for marine life. Endangered and threatened species utilizing the atoll include the endangered Antillean Manatee, Hawksbill Sea Turtle, Nassau Grouper, Roseate Tern, Crowned Pigeon, American Crocodile, the white-spotted Toadfish, which is endemic to Belize. Other types of tropical marine life inhabit Turneffe including dolphins, manta rays, sea turtles, and a wide variety of reef fish. Birdlife is profuse including ospreys, frigate birds, and numerous species of terrestrial and shore birds.

THREATS
The traditional users have existed in harmony with Turneffe Atoll, utilizing the natural resources in a sustainable manner. However, commercial development pressures are now intensifying. Unsustainable development with its associated environmental impacts such as dredging, soil erosion, boating and sedimentation can have a devastating impact on the Turneffe's ecosystem and wildlife. Overfishing, especially of spawning aggregations of reef fish, has also recently become a problem.

CONSERVATION PLAN
The Oceanic Society in collaboration with the Coastal Zone Management Authority and Institute, local organizations and the Belize Fishermen's Cooperative is working to designate Turneffe Atoll as an international Biosphere Reserve. This will help to protect the biological diversity of Turneffe Atoll while protecting the rights of traditional users and ensuring only sustainable use of the atoll.

The traditional users have been excellent stewards of their environment, however rapid development pressures require an integrated effort. With your help, Turneffe Atoll's biological integrity can be preserved.

You can be part owner and receive an honorary Deed to Blackbird Caye, Turneffe Atoll.

Please join us in supporting and protecting Turneffe Atoll. Donations to Adopt-an-Atoll will be applied 100% in support of this initiative. You may select your level of support as follows:

  • $50 - 1/2 Acre
  • $100 - 1 Acre
  • $200 - 2 Acres
  • $500 - 5 Acres

ATOLL ADOPTION FORM

Please fill out:

  • Your adoption choice
  • Whether this is a gift or not
  • Gift Recipient (leave blank if this is not a gift)
  • Provide name and address below ONLY IF item is to be sent to the gift recipient

When you proceed to Checkout, you will fill in the information about you as the purchaser